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online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases of champagne and bouquets of flowers from the white house. because on certain readings you could say, you know, he's the guy who got the president reelected. that means, i believe, he has great insight into what obama's second term economic policy will be -- [laughter] and the big question on the agenda which i think certainly already tremendous bearing on u.s., on the u.s. domestic economy and, therefore, u.s.
china, india, indonesia. so the challenges are enormous, frankly, the strong leadership from the white house, secretary clinton, we have been able to do a lot, and i think build on some remarkable achievement through the previous administration including the opening to india. i would say. those are the opportunity. ierpically, for me, the biggest challenge are the personal ones. i have a wife who is also a senior administration official and we have young children and trying to balance figuring how how to be in certain places when you have, you know, pressing either international or domestic, you know, kind of family business is remarkably difficult. and, you know, there's the let down when you're not there in certain things or the embarrassment when you're diplomatic and on the phone, hears your daughter screaming at the top of heifer lungs as you're trying to -- i'm not. one screaming, my it's my daughter. [laughter] a lot it is happened the other way around. so i would say, you know, it's been a remarkable as you're going through each of our resumes and experiences it's been an incre
, an armed supplier, trading partner with india. the russians answer to the f-35 is the t-50 and the russians are selling the t-50 to india. russia doesn't want to renew the 1990cto, the cooperative threat reduction program, an american financed program. they don't trust america anymore saying america shouldn't tell other countries what their moral values should be when newspaper stories prove we're lacking miranda rule values here in the united states. we have a real big problem going on worldwide, and we just have to completely stop and get into peace negotiations and talk about whose trading partners with who. >> the bills were reform, and none of those directly affect foreign policy because, i believe, that we need to clean house and tend to our own problems before we stick our nose into other people's problems, and the only thick that directly affects the war in syria is that you would have to obey the constitution as originally intended and amended and require congress to declare war on any country where we commit troops. >> getting back to the issue of jobs, f-35, and senator sanders t
nuclearÑ.' masterful mind. nip know how many cases of polio there were in india last year? there was one in 2011, and there's been zero since that time. down to three countries that have polio. this is one of the works of the gate's foundation. bill is going to come and out talk for a few moments on another passion of his which is u.s. education. he'll speak here for a few moments, and we've asked david who is a bureau chief of the "new york times," to come out, join bill up here in the stage and continue with an interview for a few moments. i spoke to david ahead of time asking if he'd do the interview, and david is a pulitzer prize winner, and he asked is there a gate's prize? i said, no, there's not a gate's prize, david, and i hope i didn't take too big a liberty here in asking him to come. i have committed on behalf of the gate's foundation, when there is a prize, david will be the first recipient. [laughter] let me present bill gates. [applause] good afternoon. i want to talk a bit about higher education. the reason i picked that is because i think it's been a huge strength of the
by risks associated just with rising sea levels. one is diago garcia, a small island south of india, home to a although gist particular hub -- logistic hub. even absent a storm or tsunami, this installation is threatened by intkaeugs for slow -- inundation of slow staepbd did i sea level rise. the norfolk naval base is home to the u.s. atlantic fleet. a "new york times" analysis this past weekend using u.s. geological survey and noaa data showed a five-foot sea level rise would permanently flood portions of that base. the base is at continuing risk from storm surges. by the way, a five-foot sea level rise is now predicted to be a possibility in this century. eglin air force on florida's gulf coast is threatened by storm surge, sea level rise and salt water infiltration. we know -- we know that climate change loads the dice for more and more severe extreme weather. retired brigadier general steven anderson and retired lieutenant general daniel christman used katrina as an example of how extreme weather can cause negative operational impacts to our military. in response to katrina the natio
's the long-term when you think about it. you look at some of the work that is happening in india, for example, to try to attract foreign direct investment, to try to attract more entrepreneur, i'm not sure it's still very early in term of the result. i think for the last three decades, the u.s. has had, you know, historically a very healthy immigration pots -- policy, but in the last decade or so, we have gone the other way. when you think about the number of immigrants that come in and build amazing companies, and created jobs, you know, in the hundreds of thousands, we can't be looking at other markets because i don't think there's the perfect model. i think we need to look back at what was happening in the 1970s. in term of the u.s. in the historical model. we did encourage a lot of immigration. a lot of people came in with science, technology, mathematics background. you look at silicon valley, you see the fruit of a lot of that. >> you had a comment? >> i spent seven years of my life painfully as a member of the commission on immigration reform, which was chairmaned by bosch are a jordan
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6